Car models come and go. Some are just not meant for the long haul (Ford Taurus), some had a nice run and then ceased (remember the Honda Prelude?), some phase in and out (VW Beetle). While fans of the AMC Pacer are still grumbling decades later, there are some car owners out there that may not even be aware that their car, truck or SUV is no longer in production.

A few models drop by the wayside each year, and this can lead to headaches if the owner bought the extended warranty on their Chevy Volt – its last year of production was 2019.

Parts and servicing

Generally speaking, auto manufacturers will continue to make or provide parts and servicing. But the laws and supply and demand do come into play, meaning that models can be challenging to maintain. This leads to a cottage industry for mechanics, parts suppliers and salvage yards.

What if it is a Lemon?

Dealerships want to move on to new models, but Lemon laws do apply to used cars and discontinued models with a defect. They cannot refuse to fix it, nor can they charge for the work if it is a defect. They should also honor all valid warranties and fix production defects.

How will they replace it?

If they cannot fix the vehicle after a reasonable number of attempts, the manufacturer or dealer may replace the car. In this case, they can provide a similar type of vehicle of similar value as a replacement. Another option should be to buy back the vehicle for a fair price, which may not be the dealer or manufacturer’s first offer.

 

These matters often negotiated

In complicated cases like these, it is usually best to speak with a Lemon law attorney based here in California. They can help hold manufacturers and dealers accountable for the products they made and sold.