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lemon law Archives

How Implied Warranty of Merchantability works

There are a variety of laws that protect buyers and sellers during a business transaction. Some of these laws cover issues that are spelled out in a contract, while others are more implied. The Implied Warranty of Merchantability (IWM) falls into the latter category. While many have never heard the term used, they have a general understanding of how an IWM works – a common example is a buyer who returns a product they just bought because it does not work. This happens regardless of contract or receipt.

What is “crashworthiness”?

The word “crashworthiness” may sound like a word made up by a clever car salesperson, but it is actually one of the most important term used in vehicle defect cases. The term describes the ability of the vehicle to prevent injury to occupants in the event that there is a crash.

Center for Auto Safety ranks all 50 states' Lemon Laws

The Center for Auto Safety is a consumer advocacy group that has supported Lemon Laws since Connecticut drafted the first one 37 years ago. It has now looked at the laws in all 50 states as well as the District of Columbia and ranked them. California did pretty well in taking the 12th spot (more on that in a minute), but it was New Jersey that took the top spot, while Illinois was at the bottom.

Hyundai and Kia facing suit

Korean motor vehicle manufacturers Hyundai Motor Co. and Kia Motors Corp. were sued over defects that reportedly cause their engine to catch fire. According to Bloomberg and others, 350 consumer complaints involving non-collision fires were reported to the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The class-action lawsuit was filed December 14 in the Central District of California. The affected models are Kia Sorento, Kia Optima, Hyundai Sonata, Hyundai Santa Fe, and 2010-2015 Kia Soul.

California Lemon applies to some commercial vehicles

California Lemon Laws are some of the strictest in the country, and for good reason. Our famously car-centric culture means that we spend a lot of time in our vehicles, whether it is for personal reasons or conducting business. Either way, the roads are usually full with drivers in vehicles of all shapes and sizes.

What to do when dealers do not provide sufficient results

It is an unfortunate fact that dealerships cannot or will not solve all motor vehicle issues. Whether they have fixed a car multiple times without results, or if they claim there is no issue with the vehicle, owners and their attorneys sometimes need to look elsewhere for satisfaction. The next step in this process for many is turning to the manufacturer.

How to get the most out of a test drive

The test drive is one of the more enjoyable parts of car shopping. Some look at it as a chance to stomp on the gas, perhaps drive a car out of their price range, or just have a little fun, but the test drive addresses some important considerations. Here are some tips from experts about how to make the most of it.

Diagnosing a steering problem

The Ford Fusion and certain other models have become infamous for problems with their steering. For the safety of the driver, passengers and fellow motorists, it is advisable to address a steering issue as soon as possible. However, it is not a bad idea to gather a little information before going to the mechanic. These from experts may be easy fixes, or at the very least provide you and the mechanic a certain level of information when you bring the car in for work to be done.

New study announces vehicles with most lemon complaints

The highly respected Autowise.com announced its list of eight recent vehicle models with the highest number of lemon complaints. Compiled by the site's staff, this is the first annual list. The site defines "lemon" as cars that have been out of service at least three or four times. Along with the staff's picks, Autowise.com also crunched complaint data from the 500-plus forums it maintains.

How does lemon law buyback work?

Lemon law buyback vehicles are usually so badly flawed that manufacturers deem them unfit to be on the road. In their eyes, the vehicles are unsafe and not of sufficient value, so manufacturers “buyback” these vehicles from the consumer.